Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Elm Lowne circa 1798


Two hundred and eleven year old "Elm Lowne" Horse Stables. I took these pictures with my pocket camera last spring or summer.

27 comments:

  1. Beautiful and in good shape for their age. :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. What a fabulous barn, that stone foundation is terrific. It seems today old barns are being replaced by metal buildings, which is really a shame. I hope more people will preserve these pieces of Americana.
    I'm quite excited, I actually have a reflection picture for this Friday!
    Sunny :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. This work reminds me of a work of your monochrome.
    It was the bridge which had such a form. Children sat down on it.

    It was the first time that I watched a grand photograph of the blog.
    Thereafter I learned a lot from your works.

    The new possibility is really splendid.  
    I respect and thanks for your wonderful world.

    From the Far East.
    Best regards.
    ruma

    ReplyDelete
  4. Very nice shots. Nice colors and textures.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Good shots for a pocket camera. Until now, I still have not found the answer why barns are painted red. It is a favorite color.

    ReplyDelete
  6. What a magnificient building! I love it:)

    ReplyDelete
  7. belle ferme en bois, j'aime beaucoup, on en a pas beaucoup en France

    ReplyDelete
  8. The architecture is a little like the one we can find here: stones down and wood above.This one is well kept, somebody cares!

    ReplyDelete
  9. Love the mix of stone and wood, like in old Europe.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Gotta love a red barn! I love that is has survived all these years.

    ReplyDelete
  11. Love this barn. The mix of stone and wood, with the ivy creeping up the side - beautiful. It's wonderful that they've kept this up rather than tearing down and building some ugly modern monstrosity. Kathy

    ReplyDelete
  12. Love 'em. Your shots and barns. This one is HUGE. Very nice!

    ReplyDelete
  13. Excellent results from the pocket camera!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Quite a building. I am wondering what is inside when looking at the windows...

    ReplyDelete
  15. Beautiful! Someone has been taking good care of this place.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Oh how I love red barns!
    By the way, the 50mm f/1.4 was what I shot the graveyard with. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  17. I'm a big fan of the Road Trip, and remember many such sights. What a treat to have them recreated so beautifully to enjoy here in SoCal.

    I know it is pretty built up and commercialized now, but have you been to Lancaster and the Amish Country?

    ReplyDelete
  18. Not to be a temptress, James, but have you tried the 50mm f/1.2 ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  19. That's a lot of beauty for anything over 200 years old. Red barns are a wonderful reminder of our history. I hope they never disappear from our landscape.
    Your shots are stunning, James.

    ReplyDelete
  20. It has stood the test of time well!

    ReplyDelete
  21. They knew how to build stuff that weathers well and lasts, didn't they? Did they realize how we'd gawp and ooh and aah because it's beautiful too?

    ReplyDelete
  22. How nice it is that this stable has been cared for for so many years...something we don't often do in this country. We let it age and rot or knock it down to be replaced. Your pocket camera did a great job! Such nice color and texture and I really like the compositions.

    ReplyDelete
  23. I like the rustic look... 'course that's to be expected from a building that's over 200 years old.

    ReplyDelete
  24. Very nice, colorful and what interesting buildings.

    ReplyDelete
  25. It's amazing this old barn is so beautiful and it's still firm!I loved those old stones!
    Léia

    ReplyDelete
  26. wow! one barn, so much history. Can you imagine how many animals have lived there over the years. Those pocket cameras get some great pics - with a bit of help from a good photographer.

    ReplyDelete